Conversation on Indo-European and Linguistic Analysis with my friend

Charles Lincon
2 min readMay 3

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Recently I had an interesting conversation over text with my friend Andrei.

We discussed the evolution of language and writing in human societies, particularly in ancient Greece. We pondered the fact that oral tradition was prevalent for many more years than writing and that most people in Ancient Athens — even around Socrates’s time — may not have been able to read. Isn’t that incredible?

We also explored the origins of the Greek writing system and how it was based on the Phoenician alphabet. We found it interesting that the Greeks lost the ability to write during the Dark Ages of Homer and then regained it later on.

The conversation then delved into the Indo-European (IE) people and how their society was adaptable due to their trifunctionalism, which made them successful in terms of moving quickly, fighting, trading, and assimilating, especially with the help of horses and chariots. However, we agreed that the IE original people were not all that special and that it was only through contact with the more advanced civilizations of the Mediterranean, Egypt, and Mesopotamia that they began to thrive.

Furthermore, we discussed the notion of a master race and how discussing race in this manner is ignorant and unfounded. We both agreed that race does not have any basis in anything.

Overall, this conversation offered a fascinating insight into the evolution of language and writing, as well as the impact of cultural and societal exchanges on the development of civilizations. It also highlighted the importance of being open-minded and embracing diversity, rather than adhering to narrow-minded and baseless beliefs.

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Charles Lincon

Renaissance literature, Shakespeare, Hegelian dialectics, Attic Greek, masters University of Amsterdam.